President Peter Mutharika has challenged the quasi-religious group and governance watchdog Public Affairs Committee (PAC) to form a political party ,and dare his Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) during the elections due 2019.

President Peter Mutharika has challenged the quasi-religious group and governance watchdog Public Affairs Committee (PAC) to form a political party ,and dare his Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) during the elections due 2019.
Mutharika was speaking Monday at Biwi Triangle in Lilongwe during a political rally he addressed on return from Southern Region.
The President was hitting at PAC which issued a statement last week that the country was currently experiencing mediocrity as poverty levels have been deeply entrenched among ordinary citizens.
But Mutharika said the quasi-religious group was harbouring sinister political motives.
“A PAC angoyambitsa chipani [PAC should just form a political party],” said Mutharika.
“They should stop hiding behind religion because the committee no longer speaks for the people,” he added.
Mutharika expressed misgivings with PAC assessment that during the past three years, the DPP administration has failed to fulfil its own manifesto, citing what it described as deep-rooted corruption, fraud and selective justice.
He said the DPP administration should be credited for implementing numerous development projects, which he said PAC is failing to recognise.
But PAC chairperson the Reverend Felix Chingota maintained that the DPP administration has failed miserably.
Chingota said they would not be intimidated but the body will continue to do its prophetic work.
“The mediocrity we experience today will not improve the lives of Malawians and the nation needs to wake up to the call,” he said.
He said as PAC’s duty is merely to provide safe space for Malawians to discuss pertinent issues, the body would be holding the Sixth All-Inclusive Stakeholders Conference in May this year where it will ask Malawians to decide the next action as regards the future of the nation.

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